A Question of Attitude: South Korea's Traditional Medicine Practitioners and Wildlife Conservation

Authors: 
Kang, S., and M. Phipps
Document Type: 
report
Citation: 
Kang, S., and M. Phipps. 2003. A Question of Attitude: South Korea's Traditional Medicine Practitioners and Wildlife Conservation. TRAFFIC Report. Hong Kong. 58pp
Ref ID: 
6173
Ref User: 
admin
Ref Type: 
Report
Year Published: 
2003
Sec Title: 
TRAFFIC East Asia Report
Date Input: 
11/03/2006 3:00
Availability: 
PDF, website
Language: 
English
Country: 
Hong Kong
Url: 
http://www.traffic.org/content/236.pdf
Date Modified: 
11/03/2006 3:00
Modified by: 
admin
Last Post: 
11/03/2006 3:00
Bushmeat Asian Type: 
wildlife trade
Keywords: 
traditional medicine; South Korea; survey; attitudes; practioners
Abstract: 
Kang, S., and M. Phipps. 2003. A Question of Attitude: South Korea's Traditional Medicine Practitioners and Wildlife Conservation. TRAFFIC East Asia Report. Hong Kong. 58pp Traditional Korean medicine (TKM) is based on thousands of years of experience and tradition. At times, it includes the use of threatened or endangered wildlife species, such as Tiger, rhinoceros, musk deer, bear, and pangolin. Under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and under South Korea
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